Home Page

Pupil Premium results for previous years

The Pupil Premium for disadvantaged children

 

The Pupil Premium is funding allocated to schools for each pupil who are eligible for free school meals

(FSM) or have been in the last 6 years. Providing additional funding for children who are able to take free school meals is one of the current Government’s key education policies. The pupil premium is also allocated to children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months and children where a parent serves in the armed forces.

 

Schools decide how best to deploy this fund and it is imperative that it has an impact on the educational attainment of children in the groups highlighted above. The pupil premium has the potential to have a great impact on the attainment, and future life chances, of all pupils not merely those identified as disadvantaged.

 

Pupil Premium Spending 2021 / 22

 

At Manor Wood Primary School we recognise that all children are individual and have different needs. Therefore, if we feel that a child would benefit from specific support, we will invest pupil premium funds to provide it including; small group learning to stretch and challenge, social and emotional support, particular resources and interventions, funding to attend music lessons, extra-curricular opportunities etc.

 

A large proportion of our funding is spent on additional classroom support. However, we are flexible in our thinking and do our best to provide a personalised approach to learning for all children. It is clear that our pupil premium children make good progress as a result of targeted, individual support. However, there remains a gap in attainment that we are working hard to address. 

 

We review the progress of all our children informally throughout the year and formally every term. We provide feedback to governors in all full governing body meetings and in sub-committees and meet regularly with teachers. Pupil Progress meetings often focus on pupil premium children and parents are updated regarding their children's progress / attainment.

 

The school's strategy regarding the provision for Pupil Premium children will be reviewed in September 2022.

Unfortunately, due to the pandemic there are no results for 2020 - 21 as statutory testing did not take place across the country. 

The Pupil Premium for disadvantaged children

 

The Pupil Premium is funding allocated to schools for each pupil who are eligible for free school meals

(FSM) or have been in the last 6 years. Providing additional funding for children who are able to take free school meals is one of the current Government’s key education policies. The pupil premium is also allocated to children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months and children where a parent serves in the armed forces.

 

Schools decide how best to deploy this fund and it is imperative that it has an impact on the educational attainment of children in the groups highlighted above. The pupil premium has the potential to have a great impact on the attainment, and future life chances, of all pupils not merely those identified as disadvantaged.

 

Pupil Premium Spending 2021 / 22

 

At Manor Wood Primary School we recognise that all children are individual and have different needs. Therefore, if we feel that a child would benefit from specific support, we will invest pupil premium funds to provide it including; small group learning to stretch and challenge, social and emotional support, particular resources and interventions, funding to attend music lessons, extra-curricular opportunities etc.

 

A large proportion of our funding is spent on additional classroom support. However, we are flexible in our thinking and do our best to provide a personalised approach to learning for all children. It is clear that our pupil premium children make good progress as a result of targeted, individual support. However, there remains a gap in attainment that we are working hard to address. 

 

We review the progress of all our children informally throughout the year and formally every term. We provide feedback to governors in all full governing body meetings and in sub-committees and meet regularly with teachers. Pupil Progress meetings often focus on pupil premium children and parents are updated regarding their children's progress / attainment.

 

The school's strategy regarding the provision for Pupil Premium children will be reviewed in September 2022.

Unfortunately, due to the pandemic there are no results for 2020 - 21 as statutory testing did not take place across the country. 

 

Pupil premium strategy statement

 

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

 

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Manor Wood PS

Number of pupils in school

494

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

15%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

1 – 2 years

Date this statement was published

October 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

September 2022

Statement authorised by

Deborah Kenny

Pupil premium lead

Deborah Kenny / Alison Robson

Governor / Trustee lead

Nadia El-Aoud

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£103, 840

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£0

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£103,840

 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

At Manor Wood Primary School (MWPS) we have high aspiration and ambition for all our children and believe that every child should be able to fulfil their potential. We are committed to ensuring that all our children are given every chance to achieve, prosper and lead happy, healthy lives.

Pupil Premium funding is targeted at maximising the achievement of disadvantaged children and in a way which supports their individual needs.  

We, at Manor Wood, absolutely believe that all children can succeed, and we have a solution focused approach to overcoming barriers. We support children to develop a love for learning and ensure that we meet their individual needs and interests effectively.

We ensure that all staff know who the disadvantaged children are and that the most appropriate strategies / support are in place for them. We help them to have full access to clubs and activities across school and to take part in out of school activities.

Activities and clubs are monitored to ensure that they reflect the whole school population including disadvantaged children. Where this is not the case, we proactively recruit disadvantaged children and fund them if necessary. In addition, we constantly monitor the effectiveness of strategies on learning and review provision in the light of tracking data and other evidence. All staff are involved in the analysis of data so that they are fully aware of the requirements of Pupil Premium Funding and the impact of their work is having on the progress of disadvantaged children.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Social, emotional and mental health issues

2

A potential lack of readiness for school

3

Special Educational Needs

4

Issues around attainment and achievement

5

Poor attendance and punctuality

6

Language issues making it difficult to access school

7

Lack of enrichment experiences outside of school including sporting and creative opportunities

8

Limited educational aspirations outside school

9

Issues with nutrition

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Children who are identified as disadvantaged are effectively supported to achieve their full potential through outstanding teaching and learning and appropriate intervention where necessary

Progress is in line with or above their non-disadvantaged peers as evidenced by observations and improving progress / attainment data

The CC engages with vulnerable families prior to them joining our school / nursery. Vulnerable children in the Baby Nest, 2-year-old provision and pre-school are quickly identified, and families supported to prepare them for the future.

Outside agencies, where appropriate are contacted to provide additional support / guidance including Health Visitors and Social Services

Children are increasingly school ready and can access the opportunities on offer earlier and more effectively. Vulnerable families have positive relationships with school and are working in partnership to support their child’s development

Pastoral support in place for identified children is having a positive impact on social, emotional and mental health issues. Children are quickly identified to work with pastoral support both within school and in the cluster and families have access to outside agencies regarding housing, finance etc or access to the team in school regarding their child

There are fewer disadvantaged children with social and emotional issues as identified through data, verbal feedback, wellbeing audits and issues recorded on CPOMS

Classroom teachers recognise their responsibility for the progress of all children including those with SEND and deliver an appropriate curriculum which is differentiated to meet their needs. TAs share in planning and are skilled to work with individual children who have complex and other special needs.

Children with SEND make effective progress from their starting points as evidenced by observations and data. They are included in lessons where appropriate and are recognised as adding to the richness of the learning experience for all children

Strategies are in place which support families to address issues around attendance and punctuality including first day calling, targeted lists, rewards, cluster support for families, access to breakfast club with funding, regular meetings with the safeguarding lead and the HT

 

Attendance figures for disadvantaged children are in line with their non-disadvantaged peers. Feedback from children illustrate that they are happy to attend school, that their work is set at an appropriate level, and they have friendship groups to support them. Also, that parents have a good relationship with school and that has impacted on their child’s attendance.

Staff are confident and equipped to support the children who are new to English or EAL effectively in terms of language and understanding

Observations and data illustrate the children new to English or EAL are beginning to make progress in line with their peers. Their speaking and listening skills are improving as is their confidence to converse in lessons. In addition, their understanding of more sophisticated vocabulary is increasing the more they are exposed to less frequently used words.

Disadvantaged children are identified to take part in clubs and activities which interest or extend them and have access to all opportunities which take place in the school day and outside it

Monitoring and data illustrates that disadvantaged children are represented in all clubs, activities and opportunities, based on their interests in school. They are Team Leaders and RP Reps and funding enables them to pursue their interests and skills. They have access to funded music lessons and some external sports activities

Opportunities are taken throughout the year focused on increasing aspirations including visits from role models, presentations from people representing varied professions, twilights and information for parents etc

Evidence from discussions, questionnaires illustrate that children are increasingly aware of their career options and have a potential career path. Also, parents’ aspirations rise in terms of future options, including further education, for their children

Nutrition is regularly visited via the curriculum and children are reminded about healthy eating, exercise and the impact on their general wellbeing.

Lunches are healthy and balanced, and families are encouraged to provide healthy packed lunches.

Support is provided to families via the pastoral team, cluster support and CC where needed.

Children understand what constitutes a healthy meal and can articulate that verbally. They recognise the importance of exercise and caring for their teeth and mental health.

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £40,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Appointment of additional staff to early years to support further inclusion at the start of school   

EEF Toolkit – suggests that children make an additional +4 months progress when TAs are used effectively

EEF – Making Best Use of use of Teaching Assistants + 4 months

3, 1, 2

Extending the hours of the experienced Inclusion Manager for SEND (to 4 days per week)

 

CPD to deliver effective phonics in the Early Years

Having the IM for additional time has an impact on learning as she trains / supports the TAs and teachers to deliver specific small group tuition which adds 4 months to learning

EEF Early Years Toolkit - + 5 months

DFE guidance.

3

 

 

 

4

 

CPD for supporting children with SEND for all staff

As above

3

CPD and support for an Early Careers Teacher (ECT)

DfE. We are involved in the Leeds Teaching Hub and UCL which focuses on retaining new teachers in the profession and providing high quality mentoring over the course of 2 years. This clearly impacts on children’s learning

4

Continued CPD for Seesaw and new technology across school

As a result of Covid experiences of home teaching etc. Some aspects, including information and CPD for parents, were very successful on Seesaw

8

CPD for staff with a focus on addressing the needs of disadvantaged children.

Funding for cover to enable detailed pupil progress meetings to take place and training for mentors

We know that well-trained practitioners really impact on social and emotional development and children’s learning.

It also ensures that all our staff know our children well and their particular strengths / needs

4

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £49,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Continued CPD focused on “Maths No Problem” strategy

This scheme improves mastery learning, (EEF +5 months) independence and enjoyment of mathematics

4

Identification and purchase of new materials for delivering phonics and providing CPD for staff

DfE guidelines suggest that a structured systematic phonics scheme must be linked to the reading scheme for children to learn and rehearse phonics

4

Teaching Assistants to support vulnerable groups in classes and to lead appropriate interventions, for example pre-teaching, ‘Write from the start’ which supports motor skills, ‘Letter join ‘and the SENIT phonics intervention etc

EEF - + 4 months impact for small group learning and + 4 months impact for specific interventions.

All our interventions are closely monitored for impact on individual children 

4, 6

Delivery of Clicker 7, Nessy, Touch Typing, Lexia and ‘Use the Active Literacy Kit ‘for reading and spelling to identified groups and individuals

EEF - + 4 months impact. Staff are effectively trained, and parents are involved in some aspects of these interventions

3

Targeted maths interventions to support children using Plus 1 and Power of 2 resources. 

EEF- + 4 months

Children work one to one on these specific maths interventions. 

 

Every Child a Reader (ECAR)

Reading strategies are judged by the EEF as adding 6 months to a child’s reading and comprehension abilities

4

A qualified practitioner on site who can undertake Dyslexia tests and programmes for identified children

EEF - + 6 months. However, the overall impact of this work is much greater, is transformative and is hugely valued by parents

3, 4

Dyslexia friendly reading books to support the Dyslexic children across school

 EEF -+ 6 months

 Baringtonstoke

 

Beanstalk volunteer readers

As above

4

After school clubs focused on areas where there are gaps in learning in particular year groups

EEF - + 4 months

7

Information sharing / training for parents to support their children at home

EEF - + 4 months impact

EYFS EEF Toolkit

8

A focus on speaking and listening across the curriculum – leader in place and strategy around the Shakespeare Project and Big Talk

EEF - + 6 months impact

Other metrics used in school absolutely show this makes a difference to understanding and vocab acquisition. This was also recognised by OFSTED (2019)

4, 6

Additional Teacher in upper KS2 and KS1 for Quality Wave 1 teaching, group tuition and intervention for targeted children

EEF – + 4 months impact. However, our data and observations illustrate greater impact on learning

4

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £15,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Weekly Play Therapy for 3 children

EEF - + 4 months impact

1

Twice monthly visits from a Speech Therapist and programmes to be delivered in school

EEF - + 6 months impact

4, 6

Staff who can converse to parents in their home language and identify their specific needs around wellbeing

EEF - + 4 months.

This is also an excellent means of sharing information and making very positive relationships with families

6

Continue to subsidise breakfast club

This impacts on attendance and wellbeing as recognised by all our staff.

EEF - + 4 months

1, 5, 9

Continue initiatives and incentives for children to achieve 100% attendance

As above

1, 4, 5

Continue to contribute to the 2gether cluster to access additional support for children and families around mental health / wellbeing

As above

1

Provide after school clubs, and funding to enhance learning opportunities for children and to address issues around cultural capital

A above

OFSTED framework

Early Years Alliance Research

7, 8

Subsidise the Y6 residential to ensure all children are able to attend

As above

7

Support children to attend the summer sports club that is run by school staff during the summer holidays

As above

7

Funding for parents to purchase items such as uniform, bags, pumps etc. Just Giving fund raising following Covid. Christmas presents and food parcels for needy families

As above

1

Continue Restorative Practice (RP) across school to enable children to make the best choices in terms of their learning and behaviour

EEF - + 4 months impact

1

The creation of a new pastoral suite for the pastoral team and RP team

 EEF - + 4 months

Children and families have bespoke support. Even more important since Covid as higher numbers of children are anxious and mental health and wellbeing is essential to children making progress and enjoying schools

1

Use of the CC and pre-school resources and staff to prepare families and children for the start of school. This includes outreach workers, the CC Manager and Family Learning Mentor

EEF EY’s toolkit - + 3 months. However, we fully recognise the impact the CC and Nursery have on school readiness for our children who attend

1, 2, 5, 9

 

Total budgeted cost: £ 104,000

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Due to COVID-19, performance measures have not been published for 2020 to 2021, and 2020 to 2021 results will not be used to hold schools to account. Given this, please point to any other pupil evaluations undertaken during the 2020 to 2021 academic year, for example, standardised teacher administered tests or diagnostic assessments such as rubrics or scales.

If last year marked the end of a previous pupil premium strategy plan, what is your assessment of how successfully the intended outcomes of that plan were met?

Externally provided programmes

Programme

Provider

Writing and grammar

Alan Peat

Clicker 7 (SEND provision)

Colourful Semantics

Touch Typing

Write from the start

Letter Join

Spelling

Spelling Shed

Nessy,

Use the Active Literacy Kit (spelling)

 

Mathematics

Maths No Problem

Plus 1 and power of 2 interventions

 

Times Tables Rockstars

Reading

SENIT phonics intervention

Dyslexia Friendly reading books -Barringstoke

Use the Active Literacy Kit (reading)  and spelling)

Seesaw

RIC ,materials